Poliitikateaduse valdkonnas on veenvalt näidatud valitsemispraktikate olulisust sotsiaalse elu küsimustes. Tundub lausa triviaalne tõdemus, aga policingu ja kriminoloogia valdkonnas ei ole sedalaadi mõttekäike just sageli näha. Sestap siinne artikliviide.

Mis on safety walks?

Safety walks are a method for getting all the different actors, residents and other users in the area to meet with a knowledgeable organiser, and talk about how the area could become safer and more comfortable. The purpose is a mutual exchange of thoughts and views and an opportunity to disseminate information and discuss constructive ideas. The dialogue between citizens and local authorities is just as important as the physical changes that the walk can result in. (Brå et al., 2010, p. 5, all Brå quotes have been translated by the authors)
[…]
Safety walks are thus presented as a response to a variety of societal problems, and the expectations for what they can accomplish are high. Yet, previous research points to the limits of participatory modes of governing, such as safety walks, and outlines their depoliticizing risks.

Turvalisusküsimused kuuluvad sageli sellesse kategooriasse, mida nimetatakse nurjatud probleemideks. St, neid ei saagi lahendada ja nendega saab vaid tegeleda. Seetõttu on niisuguste probleemide “valitsetavaks” muutmine üks tõsine väljakutse kõikidele, kes selle söandavad ette võtta. Nii ongi siinviidatud artikli kokkuvõttes muuhulgas toodud ja allnevas esitatud üks oluline järeldus:

Our analysis has shown that safety walks become part of a process by which safety problems are made technical and ‘governable’ through the use of a whole set of governing techniques. These contribute to ‘defining boundaries, rendering that within them visible, assembling information about that which is included and devising techniques to mobilize the forces and entities thus revealed’ (Rose, 1999, p. 33).

Jennie Brandén & Linda Sandberg. (2021) Governing safety through the politics of community? A governmentality analysis of the practice of ‘safety walks’ in three Swedish cities. Space and Polity, DOI: 10.1080/13562576.2021.1894916